Sacramento Executive Airport, Sacramento, California



Airport Location: The Sacramento Executive Airport is located 3 miles south of Sacramento, California.

Airport History:

Sacramento Executive Airport Today:  Two helipads near tower; Intensive flight training; Banner towing; Helicopter operations;

Sacramento Executive Airport, Sacramento California

Airport Services & Amenities:  CFI; Executive Air Repair; Executive Autopilots; Executive Flyers; REACH Air Ambulance; Sacramento Executive Helicopters, Inc.; Sacramento Jet Center; Sky Walk Inc.; Public transportation; Taxis; Rental Cars available; Restaurant on the field; Aviators; Lodging within 3 miles;

Special Events and Attractions: Aerospace Museum of California; Golf; McClellan AFB; Railroad Museum; State Capitol; Old Sacramento;

Airport Area Accident History:

Accident occurred Saturday, February 11, 2006 in Sacramento, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 5/29/2007
Aircraft: Cessna 172N, registration: N739GY
Injuries: 5 Uninjured.
A taxiing Cessna 172N collided with a stationary Cessna 172P in the run-up area. The pilot of the Cessna 172N positioned himself behind the 172P in the run up area. He completed his checklists, and requested takeoff clearance. He received permission to taxi into position and hold on the runway, and added power to taxi around the 172P. He said he failed to realize the close proximity of his airplane's left wing to the 172P's rudder. His airplane's wing tip collided with the other airplane's rudder and vertical stabilizer. The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows: the pilot's failure to maintain adequate clearance from obstacles while taxiing. ===
Accident occurred Saturday, February 11, 2006 in Sacramento, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 5/29/2007
Aircraft: Cessna 172P, registration: N54661
Injuries: 5 Uninjured.
A taxiing Cessna 172N collided with this airplane that was stationary in the run-up area. The pilot of the Cessna 172N positioned himself behind this airplane in the run up area. He completed his checklists, and requested takeoff clearance. He received permission to taxi into position and hold on the runway, and added power to taxi around this airplane. He said he failed to realize the close proximity of his airplane's left wing to this airplane's rudder. His airplane's wing tip collided with the this airplane's rudder and vertical stabilizer. The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows: the failure of the pilot of the other airplane to maintain an adequate clearance from obstacles while taxiing. ===
Accident occurred Saturday, September 06, 2003 in Sacramento, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/28/2004
Aircraft: Piper PA-28-161, registration: N9141Y
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Uninjured.
After starting the engine for a late night flight, the pilot advanced the throttle to move the airplane forward when he felt something stop the airplane. He asked a friend, standing outside near the airplane, to check if it was stuck on anything. She replied negatively and when she turned to walk away, the propeller struck and severed her right arm. The following morning airport personnel observed that the left wing and tail were not secured by their respective tie down chains; however, the right wing tie down chain was secured to the right wing. The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows: the pilot's inadequate preflight inspection and the bystander's failure to maintain clearance with the rotating propeller. ===
Accident occurred Saturday, July 06, 2002 in Sacramento, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 4/17/2003
Aircraft: Grumman-Schweizer G-164B, registration: N3631B
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.
After taking off and initiating a left turn at an altitude of approximately 15 feet agl, the pilot heard a "loud bang and a sharp jolt as the airplane began shaking violently." The pilot leveled the wings and reduced power; however, the vibration did not subside. He then initiated a shallow right turn in order to land on a road. "As I began to maneuver for landing I saw a burst of flame from the exhaust and heard the engine quit and felt the aircraft settle." The airplane impacted a levee and flipped over, coming to rest inverted. During post-accident investigation of the wreckage, it was noted that the outboard section of one propeller blade was missing. The inboard section of the Hamilton Standard propeller blade was sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory Division for examination. It was reported that the blade was fractured approximately 26 to 27 inches from the butt end. Optical examination of the fracture face found features consistent with fatigue progression over the majority of the fracture. Closer examinations revealed beach marks and other progression features indicating fatigue initiation at a mechanical dent on the camber surface near midspan. Further examination indicated that fatigue accounted for approximately 70% of the total fracture area. The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows: Propeller blade failure due to fatigue. A contributing factor was the rising embankment. ===
Accident occurred Wednesday, May 08, 2002 in Sacramento, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 9/30/2003
Aircraft: Cessna 152, registration: N67975
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.
The airplane collided with two parked fuel trucks while taxiing for takeoff. The pilot stated that she started the airplane after fueling it and was holding the brakes. She felt like she needed to move her seat forward slightly and grabbed the dash with one hand while releasing the seat lock with the other. The seat then slid all the way back on the tracks and her feet were now off the pedals. The airplane began to move forward and she could not reach the pedals and her passenger, who had no prior flight experience, tried to push on the bottoms of the pedals instead of the tops to activate the brakes. Before the pilot could take further remedial actions, the airplane taxied into two parked fuel trucks. The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows: Failure of the pilot to ensure the seat was set properly prior to engine start, and not using the parking brake when adjustment of seat was necessary, which resulted in the inadvertent deactivation of the brakes and subsequent collision with the fuel trucks. ===
Accident occurred Thursday, December 14, 2000 in SACRAMENTO, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/25/2003
Aircraft: Dehavilland DHC-6, registration: N252SA
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 6 Uninjured.
A passenger aboard an airplane sustained fatal injuries when she exited the airplane through an emergency exit during flight. The emergency exit door, hinged along the edge toward the nose of the airplane, was on the right side of the cabin between the right rear single seat and the rear pair of seats. Opening the door in flight would require significant force to overcome the wind pressure. The deceased passenger sat by herself next the emergency exit. The passengers in the seats immediately ahead of the emergency exit said they heard a loud sound, like rushing air, behind them and knew this wasn't normal. They thought they felt the wind, and one passenger turned to look over his right shoulder. He saw the deceased passenger with her shoulders out of the door. Her left arm was passing over his head, so he grabbed her coat at her left wrist. He tried to reach further right for a better hold, but now could only see the dark coat and her arm. He felt a tug; the female slipped from his grasp and fell clear of the airplane. Officers from the San Jose Police Department, agents from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and the investigator-in-charge (IIC) from the Safety Board examined the airplane after FBI personnel completed a forensic analysis of the cabin. A red cover, inscribed with the word "LIFT" in white letters, lay over the emergency exit door's operating handle. With this cover lifted up, the handle required a noticeable force to rotate it about 45 degrees in a clockwise direction. Rotation of the handle moved a 1/2-inch diameter metal rod approximately 1-inch from the latched to the unlatched position. The latch receptacle in the airframe did not exhibit any deformities. The IIC locked and unlocked the door several times and detected no malfunctions. The victim's husband informed the FBI that, the day before the incident, his wife scheduled an appointment for counseling later that week. Toxicological tests on the deceased passenger found no ethanol or other drug substances. The coroner's office classified the death as a suicide. The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows: The passenger committed suicide. ===
Accident occurred Friday, November 17, 2000 in SACRAMENTO, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/2/2001
Aircraft: Cessna 140, registration: N2154V
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.
During the landing rollout, the tail wheel began to vibrate. The shaking was at a slow rate initially, and then became progressively worse. The pilot stated that he attempted to ease off on the elevator pressure, but lost directional control in the process and the airplane swerved to the right. The airplane ground looped and departed the runway. The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows: The pilot's failure to maintain directional control on landing rollout. ===
Accident occurred Saturday, September 09, 2000 in SACRAMENTO, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/1/2001
Aircraft: Cessna 120, registration: N76261
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.
During the takeoff climb the airplane lost power and collided with the tops of trees during the ensuing emergency landing. The pilot stated there were no mechanical anomalies noted with the preflight, or taxi to the active runway. Prior to takeoff, the airport closed for about 5 minutes. About 4 minutes after the airport reopened, the pilot was cleared for takeoff. After takeoff the engine rpm's dropped. He suspected carburetor icing and applied the carburetor heat. The engine continued to lose power. His intent was to land in-between trees on a golf course. At the last minute he had to maneuver the airplane to avoid a golf cart. He attempted to stall the airplane into the tops of the trees. Witnesses to the accident heard the engine sputtering. At the accident site fuel was found in the left tank, and on the ground underneath the right wing. The airframe and power plant were examined. The fuel selector was stiff to move and the main discharge nozzle was leaking and stained. The carburetor heat control cable retainer bolt washer, and the mixture control cable rod end retainer bolt were both loose. The carburetor was inspected and found in noncompliance with airworthiness directives. No further mechanical anomalies were noted with the airframe, power plant, or carburetor. Conditions at the time of the accident were conducive to carburetor icing. The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows: The pilot's inadequate preflight planning and his improper use of carburetor heat that resulted in a loss of engine power due to carburetor icing following a delayed takeoff in conditions that were conducive to carburetor icing. A factor was the nonsuitable terrain for landing. ===
Accident occurred Sunday, April 02, 2000 in SACRAMENTO, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 7/17/2001
Aircraft: Owens/Richburg VANS RV6-A, registration: N4419Q
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.
The accident airplane was cleared to land in front of another airplane. During the base to final turn the left wing tip struck the runway. The nose landing gear was sheared off and the main landing gear collapsed aft, but remained attached. No mechanical malfunctions were noted with the local flight. The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows: Failure to maintain sufficient altitude while on the base to final turn for landing subsequently striking the wing tip on the runway. ===
Accident occurred Saturday, March 18, 2000 in SACRAMENTO, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 7/17/2001
Aircraft: Cessna 172M, registration: N80205
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.
This happened at Natomas Field which was closed down the same year. The pilot reported that, as the aircraft was lifting off the runway during takeoff, it settled back to the ground and veered to the left off the runway. The pilot applied wheel braking and the aircraft flipped inverted. The pilot cited poor runway condition and loose gravel as a factor in the accident. The surface wind was from the right, rear of the aircraft at 6 knots. An FAA airworthiness inspector examined the aircraft and reported that he did not observe any mechanical irregularities. The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows: The failure of the pilot to maintain directional control of the aircraft during the takeoff roll. A rough, uneven runway surface was a factor in the accident.

 Airport Approach / Landing:

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