Sanderson Field Airport: Shelton, Washington

Airport is located 3 miles north west of Shelton.

Airport History;

Sanderson Field Airport Today:

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Find Sanderson Field Airport Services and Amenities:  Olympic Air, Inc.; Fuel; Air BP Jet, 100LL; Self service 100LL, Jet, 24 hours;

Sanderson Field Airport Special Events & Attractions:  Golf; Casino; Olympic National Forest; Squaxim Indian Tribe Museum;

Sanderson Field Airport Area Accident History:

Witnesses observed the float-equipped airplane land on the lake and taxi to the middle where the engine was shut down. Two men were seen exiting the airplane and sitting on the pontoons for about 30 minutes, before going back into the airplane. The airplane then taxied several more times across the lake, consistent with a typical procedure used by float plane pilots to rough up glassy water conditions to enable the airplane to lift off sooner. The airplane then taxied to the south end, turned, and departed to the northeast. The airplane lifted off near the end of the lake and attained an altitude of about 100 feet above the water and clear of trees when the witnesses observed the wings begin to wobble. The airplane rolled hard to the left and collided with the terrain in a nose-down uncontrolled descent consistent with an aerodynamic stall. Some of the witnesses detected no change in the engine sounds and commented that there were no signs of engine
problems. An examination of the airframe and engine revealed no anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. The length of the lake traveling from the south end to the northeast end is approximately 5,000 feet.
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The float plane pilot inadvertently encountered a boat's wake during takeoff, and he lost directional control. The airplane swerved left. The pilot attempted to, but was unsuccessful at, correcting the flight path, and the right wing impacted the water.
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While returning to the departure airport for landing, the pilot reported an engine problem. The airplane was subsequently observed by two pilot-rated witnesses in a steep spiral before impacting trees in a nose down attitude. All major components of the airplane were accounted for at the accident site, and a postaccident examination of the airframe and engine failed to disclose any evidence of a mechanical malfunction or component failure. An examination of the engine and airframe fuel system components failed to find any fuel. There were no obvious indications of fuel spillage or staining of vegetation at the accident site, nor did emergency response personnel report the odor of fuel upon their arrival at the scene of the accident.
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During the in-flight portion of a flight review, the private pilot, who did not have a current flight review at the time of the accident, forgot to extend the landing gear during a practice soft-field landing. The flight instructor who was giving the flight review was aware that the pilot had not put the landing gear down, and while the aircraft was on final approach, he told the pilot multiple times to execute a go-around. The pilot, who said he did not hear the command to go around, landed the aircraft with the gear up. The flight instructor thought the pilot had heard him, and was going to do a go-around, and he therefore did not take remedial action to insure the aircraft did not land with its gear up. The pilot did not use a checklist.
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The pilot said that he had initially departed from Ephrata, Washington, with 3 hours of fuel; he said that the 145 nautical mile trip should have taken him 1.3 hours. The pilot reported that he made an interim full-stop at Ellensburg, Washington; he said that he had "very heavy winds" until west of the Cascade mountains. He reported a loss of engine power on 2 mile final at Shelton, Washington. A Federal Aviation Administration Inspector disconnected the fuel line to the carburetor and drained approximately 1.25 gallons of fuel from the tanks. The manufacturer’s Owners Manual states that the airplane's fuel capacity is 26 gallons, but 3.5 gallons are unusable.
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The pilot reported that during the takeoff roll the right main landing gear tire and tube came off. The pilot stated that he aborted the takeoff, however, due to the loss of the tire, the aircraft was difficult to control. The aircraft stopped abruptly when the right wheel assembly dug into the dirt at the side of the runway. The propeller and right side wing contacted the surface. After the accident and during an inspection of the wheel, it was reported that the right main wheel outboard bead failed resulting in the separation from the wheel assembly.
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The check-out pilot reported that the landing was accomplished to runway 05 with winds from 30 degrees at 12 knots, gusting to 21 knots. During the flare for landing, with the private pilot in command, the airspeed rapidly decreased from 60 knots to 40 knots. The check-out pilot immediately added full throttle, but the aircraft landed hard on the main wheels. The check-out pilot took control of the aircraft during the resulting bounce and initiated a go-around. During the climb, the check-out pilot determined there was no un-airworthy mechanical, electrical, structural conditions, or adverse aircraft handling characteristics and opted to return to Bremerton where a landing was made without further incident. Maintenance personnel inspected the aircraft and found structural damage to the firewall.



Sanderson Field Airport Approach/Landing Video:

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